Sunday, 9 February 2014

Why Jewish Leftists are Anti-Semitic


Stalin, and many other Marxists, were against the Jews before the revolution. Not long after the Soviet Union was formed, they were against the 'Zionists' instead.

What’s going on with these Jewish far-leftist anti-Semites? How’s the circle squared exactly?
We can start by saying that Jewish leftists are only Jews on their ‘parents side’ (as someone or other once joked). They are only Jews in terms of their race, DNA or blood! These leftist Jews don’t believe in Judaism or even Jewish culture. They certainly don’t practice such things. And they are also often ashamed of (most) Jewish history too – especially what can be found in the holy books. More importantly, they completely reject the existence of the state of Israel.
For a start, these Jewish leftists are materialists and atheists. They are, well, communists of various kinds. They are only racial Jews. And that very same far left frequently tells the rest of us that ‘race doesn’t matter’ when it comes to such things.

Archie Brown, in his excellent book The Rise and Fall of Communism, also (sort of) puts the same point. He writes:
‘… since the individuals concerned [Jewish communists in the early days of the Soviet Union] had broken with Jewish traditions, it is hard to discern what difference their [Jewish] origin made on their ideas.’
Brown writes elsewhere that ‘joining the Communist Party meant distancing themselves not only from Judaism but also from distinctive Jewish customs.’ 

Another writer makes a similar point. He writes that
‘the involvement of [Jewish] individuals in this radical movement [Communism] was in most cases an act of rebellion against the traditional world of their [Jewish] parents or against the concern with particularistic Jewish issues as expressed by movements such as Zionism…’
Even Nazis admitted that many Communist Jews were not really Jews at all. For example, the Nazi apologist, Ernst Nolte, writing in 1987, wrote that ‘a conspicuous number of Jews took part in the Russian Revolution, most of them no longer saw themselves as Jews anyway.’ 

Despite that, these very same Jews, and many others, were ‘deprived of their rights [by the Soviet regime] and driven into immigration’.

Not only all that. Nolte goes on to say that no ‘other group was affected so much as Jewish communists by Stalin’s Great Purge’.

Again, these early Communists, like Chomsky today, stripped themselves bare of all Jewishness. The only thing that remained was their Jewish blood – but, again, that doesn’t count for anything, as Chomsky himself would argue (though perhaps not in this precise context).

It should not be a surprise that many Jewish Communists could be even more rabid than, say, Finkelstein.

Take the Jewish Communist, Ruth Fischer, writing in 1920s Germany:
‘Whoever cries out against Jewish capitalists is already a class warrior… Kick down the Jewish capitalists, hang them from the lampposts, and stamp upon them.’
After this psychotic Communist outburst, the Soviet regime soon realised that ‘Marxist-Leninist ideology could not be twisted to such an extent as to embrace overt anti-Semitism…’
How was that problem overcome? Yes, you guessed it:
‘… when [anti-Semitism] was deployed as a weapon in the Soviet Union, it was in the guise of attacking cosmopolitanism or Zionism.’
Thus we got:
anti-Zionism = anti-Semitism


After all, in the Soviet Union, at this time, the Jews were rather cleverly turned from being a race, or a people, into being a nationality – and this was before 1948. And Stalin didn’t like any nationality in the Union causing him problems (real or imagined), least of all a nationality made up of Jews!

This tradition of Communist anti-Semitism reached its end in the Soviet purges of the 1940s and 50s. More bizarrely, for example, even the Communist regime of Poland, as late as 1968, carried out its own campaign against ‘Zionism’. Of course hatred of the Jews in this part of the world not only proceeded the creation of the state of Israel in 1948, but even proceeded the birth of Zionism in the second half of the 19th century – by hundreds of years!

It is only natural, then, that in the 21st century that Chomsky, Finkelstein and the rest should carry on this Communist tradition of anti-Semitism, which they have done with a aplomb.

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